entertainment

People Can’t Stop Cleaning Their Houses, And It’s All Because Of Netflix’s New Show ‘Tidying Up’

by Kim Wong-Shing

Several years ago, Marie Kondo burst onto the scene with a little book called The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. Now she’s casually referred to as the “Beyoncé of tidying.”

As such, Marie recently got her very own show on Netflix, Tidying Up With Marie Kondo. This is not the first-ever show about fixing people’s messes, but it’s definitely the most soothing. Marie’s “KonMari” method starts with getting rid of items that no longer “spark joy.” The end result is a simple, intentional, organized home that… um… sorry, I got distracted glaring at my way-too-stuffed closet.

With the delightfully simple look of a KonMari’d home, it’s very tempting to immediately apply the method to your own mess. And all over social media, people are doing just that.

“Just reorganized my T-Shirt drawer. Oh yeah. Who wants to touch me? #MarieKondo,” one Twitter user bragged.

“Why yes, we DID start watching the new Marie Kondo show on netflix, why do you ask?” another wrote alongside a photo of a pile of clothes.

Whether you’re ready to tackle your mess or not, this wave of tidying is pretty darn satisfying.

On New Year’s Day, Netflix released a new show called Tidying Up With Marie Kondo.

In it, Marie Kondo, a lovely Japanese tidying expert, comes to people’s homes to basically fix their entire lives.

Marie Kondo’s approach to cleanliness is refreshing and downright spiritual (she’s partially influenced by Shintoism). For her, the goal of tidying is to create a home that makes you feel joyful, not stressed.

Every time Marie enters someone’s home, she begins by kneeling on the floor and greeting the house. Shortly after, she’ll make you gather every item of clothing that you own and pile it onto your bed.

Then you have to hold up every single item to see if it “sparks joy.” If it does, it gets to stay. If not, you thank the item and get rid of it.

Marie’s “KonMari” method of tidying is very comprehensive — it even includes a new way to fold your clothes (and bags, and electronics, and literally everything).

It’s also very, very calming to watch on Netflix. Moreover, it’s inspiring.

Thanks to the show, people everywhere are spontaneously running over to their closets and having a field day.

Netflix really made a clever move by releasing this show right after New Year’s!

 

Social media is now packed to the brim with photos of people who are in the midst of the KonMari tidying method.

Depending on which stage they’re on, these photos are impressive or just… overwhelming.

One major lesson? Even if you think you don’t have a lot of stuff, you probably have so much stuff!

But DOES IT SPARK JOY?

A lot of people were less into the “getting rid of things” part and more into the “try this cool new way to fold your clothes” part.

And just look at the results.

Folding your clothes in this neat way is a small way to spark more joy in your home. It’s also a good opportunity to post the photos on social media for clout.

Not surprisingly, some people are very insistently not going to attempt the KonMari method because they love their clutter and all of it sparks joy and they’re justfineokaythankyou!

And that is perfectly fine with Marie, who often says she “loves mess.” (She is the best.)

 

Others, however, have chosen to apply the KonMari approach to seemingly unrelated aspects of their lives.

Like their browser tabs.

Or their work emails, like this one fellow who wrote a Kondo-esque reminder on his desk.

Relatable much?

Some particularly brave people are even Kondo-ing the people in their lives, which, wow, next level. But to be fair, Marie Kondo would almost definitely agree that you should get rid of the crappy boyfriend/girlfriend/partner who does not spark joy.

And Marie is delighted to see how Tidying Up With Marie Kondo is changing people’s lives.

“I love seeing all of your posts about how it’s motivated you to tidy and find joy in your life!” Marie wrote on Instagram. “I am overwhelmed with gratitude.”