LIFE

I Put 5 Old Wives Tales For Predicting My Baby’s Gender To The Test To See Which Got It Right

by Roxy Garrity
Roxy is a reporter and writer for LittleThings. Born in North Carolina, she graduated with a journalism degree from the University of Florida, and now lives in Manhattan. She's drawn to uplifting stories that inspire her audience, and she has interviewed a range of compelling public figures, such as President Obama and Taylor Swift. She loves live music, yoga, art, traveling, all animals, and meeting new people. Send her your story ideas or just say hi!

My husband and I are expecting our first child and we’re so excited! We are one of those cliche couples when it comes to our baby’s gender: We truly do not care if it’s a boy or a girl, we just want a healthy baby.

While I don’t mind waiting to find out the sex of my baby, my husband was getting anxious and feeling the need to know, and so we decided to find out.

Finding out the gender of our baby at our 20 week anatomy scan did come with a few advantages. One was that we got to have a gender reveal party, which we of course decided to do on the LittleThings show, “Oh, Baby!?”

It also gave me the opportunity to put some of those old wives tales about how to tell what gender I am carrying to the test.

For instance, does lying on your back and putting a ring on a string to see if it swings a circular motion (that means a girl) or back and forth (that means its a boy) actually work? What about picking up a napkin when you are expecting, and if you pick it up by the edge it means you’re carrying a boy and if you pick it up by the center it means you’re carrying a girl. And then there is the test of putting baking soda in your urine. If it bubbles, apparently that means you’re having a girl. If it doesn’t, a boy.

Watch the video below to see how I fared when I tried these old wives tales.

Have you tried one of these tests yourself? Make sure to SHARE this with your friends and family.

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