homes

This Tiny House Looks Bizarre On The Outside…AND The Inside. But I’d Still Live There!

by Todd Briscoe
Todd is a LittleThings editor. He grew up in Texas and has lived in New York since 2003. He doesn't own a Boston terrier, but he will one day soon.

There’s certainly no shortage of interesting tiny houses in the world out there, and sometime it feel like our website has covered them all.

You’ve got egg-shaped houses, strange blue boxes, Hobbit holes, and tree houses.

So far, LittleThings has never seen such a strong reaction a tiny house as when we covered a fascinating triangle-shaped tiny house located in Japan. Over 7 million readers shared that post, and in my opinion, the one featured below is even more fascinating.

Like the triangle-shaped house we covered before, this tiny house gets its unusual shape from necessity. There was a tiny strip of land available for sale between two other houses.

The land was in a highly coveted neighborhood of Setagaya City in Tokyo and was very close to trains. Rather than let it go to waste, an architect got creative with how to build a house there.

The results are unlike anything I’ve ever seen, and certainly very…tiny. But I’d still consider living there. Would you?

Please SHARE if you are also fascinated by tiny houses like this.

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This two-story house has 753 square feet. It's certainly not the smallest we have covered, but it might be the thinnest.

This two-story house has 753 square feet. It's certainly not the smallest we have covered, but it might be the thinnest.

And despite its relatively modest square footage, it still carries a price tag of approximate a little over $345,000.

And despite its relatively modest square footage, it still carries a price tag of approximate a little over $345,000.

Step inside and you'll see the that hallways are so narrow, the house limits what time of furniture comes in and out. In fact, I'm not sure how any furniture that doesn't come pre-construction from Ikea could get in.

Step inside and you'll see the that hallways are so narrow, the house limits what time of furniture comes in and out. In fact, I'm not sure how any furniture that doesn't come pre-construction from Ikea could get in.

According to a study reported by the Guardian, quirky homes like these are more common in Japan because homeowners and architects can afford to build homes that may fade out of style.

According to a study reported by the Guardian, quirky homes like these are more common in Japan because homeowners and architects can afford to build homes that may fade out of style.

Homes are built more for style than longevity because of the frequency of earthquakes. Building codes get updated nearly every ten years and, as it stands right now, it is actually cheaper for many families to rebuild than to restructure.

Homes are built more for style than longevity because of the frequency of earthquakes. Building codes get updated nearly every ten years and, as it stands right now, it is actually cheaper for many families to rebuild than to restructure.

Most homes in Japan depreciate in value rapidly, and to make their home investments worth it, Japanese homeowners will destroy their house and build a brand new one to gain profit. This creates a huge demand for more modern and innovative homes.

Most homes in Japan depreciate in value rapidly, and to make their home investments worth it, Japanese homeowners will destroy their house and build a brand new one to gain profit. This creates a huge demand for more modern and innovative homes.

This planned obsolescence has resulted in an increased demand for Japanese architects. There are 2.5 architects per 1,000 residents in Japan, while the United States has only .33 architects per every 1,000 residents.

This planned obsolescence has resulted in an increased demand for Japanese architects. There are 2.5 architects per 1,000 residents in Japan, while the United States has only .33 architects per every 1,000 residents.

What this particular house lacks in space, it makes up for in amenities. It features a washer/dryer, video intercom, misting sauna, a dishwasher, and even heated floors.

What this particular house lacks in space, it makes up for in amenities. It features a washer/dryer, video intercom, misting sauna, a dishwasher, and even <i>heated floors</i>.

Wherever possible, the architect has made sure that there are plenty of windows and even skylights so it doesn't feel too claustrophobic.

Wherever possible, the architect has made sure that there are plenty of windows and even skylights so it doesn't feel too claustrophobic.

The real estate agency is selling this house as either a studio apartment, or as a private workspace in a prime area of the city.

The real estate agency is selling this house as either a studio apartment, or as a private workspace in a prime area of the city.

Is it quirky? Sure. Bizarre? Maybe. But I guarantee it won't be on the market for long.

Is it quirky? Sure. Bizarre? Maybe. But I guarantee it won't be on the market for long.

How about you? Let us know your thoughts on this house below before sharing it with friends.

Please SHARE if you love interesting architecture like this.