homes

This House And Its Entire Complex Is Built Of Thousands Of Glass Bottles

by Elyse Wanshel
Elyse is a Senior Writer at LittleThings.com. She enjoys tacos, kickboxing, and naming animals. In fact, she named two of her mother’s six cockatiels Mr. and Mrs. Featherbottom.

Here at LittleThings, we see some pretty interesting homes.

Tiny homes are fascinating little gems in and within themselves. They’re compact and need to be innovatively designed, so their interiors are filled with surprises and wonders.

But again, we write about tiny houses a lot on this site — and sometimes we see homes that blow the novelty of a tiny house right out of the water.

I’m talking some pretty strange dwellings, like a house that is shaped like a shell that makes any inhabitant feel like a human crab. Or an artist in Minnesota that literally brought the outdoors inside her house with her unique mosaics made out of sticks and stones and paintings of waterfalls.

And this home in Prince Edward Island, Canada is one of the most unique houses we’ve ever laid eyes upon. The material it is comprised of is completely shocking. In fact, most would consider the material to be trash. Yet once it was put together in this artistic way, the end result is stunning, gorgeous, and beautifully serene. It’s somewhere I’d want to visit before I die…

From far away, you really can’t tell what makes this house so special, although it’s right in front of your eyes.

From far away, you really can’t tell what makes this house so special, although it’s right in front of your eyes.

Yet when you get a little closer, you can see the muse, the main material, builder Édouard T. Arsenault used to build this incredible house in 1980.

Yet when you get a little closer, you can see the muse, the main material, builder Édouard T. Arsenault used to build this incredible house in 1980.

He was 66 when he built it.

He was 66 when he built it.

The six-gabled house is made of bottles.

The six-gabled house is made of bottles.

The house was inspired by a postcard he received from his daughter of a glass bottle castle in British Columbia.

The house was inspired by a postcard he received from his daughter of a glass bottle castle in British Columbia.

Soon after getting the postcard, he wanted to build his own bottle house, and began collecting glass bottles from his community in Cap-Egmont, Prince Edward Island, Canada.

Soon after getting the postcard, he wanted to build his own bottle house, and began collecting glass bottles from his community in Cap-Egmont, Prince Edward Island, Canada.

This house has three main sections, measures 280 square feet, and has mesmerizing patterns created from the careful selection of bottle colors and sizes.

This house has three main sections, measures 280 square feet, and has mesmerizing patterns created from the careful selection of bottle colors and sizes.

Over six months, Édouard used 85 bags cement and12,000 bottles to build this home.

Over six months, Édouard used 85 bags cement and12,000 bottles to build this home.

But he didn’t stop there. He also built a chapel made of bottles as well.

But he didn’t stop there. He also built a chapel made of bottles as well.

It is an amazing space complete with bottle pews and an altar.

It is an amazing space complete with bottle pews and an altar.

At sunset, the glass bottles behind the altar are illuminated and a rainbow of colors splash in.

At sunset, the glass bottles behind the altar are illuminated and a rainbow of colors splash in.

He also built a bottle tavern in 1982. This building is in the shape of a hexagon and uses 8,000 glass bottles.

He also built a bottle tavern in 1982. This building is in the shape of a hexagon and uses 8,000 glass bottles.

On the bar is a selection of Édouard’s favorite glass bottles from his personal collection.

On the bar is a selection of Édouard’s favorite glass bottles from his personal collection.

Whenever Édouard came across a special bottle, he preferred to keep it, rather than use it in his buildings. The bottles he collected came mostly from local restaurants, dance halls, friends, relatives, and neighbors.

Whenever Édouard came across a special bottle, he preferred to keep it, rather than use it in his buildings. The bottles he collected came mostly from local restaurants, dance halls, friends, relatives, and neighbors.

He even made his own representation of the postcard bottle that inspired the creation on his property.

He even made his own representation of the postcard bottle that inspired the creation on his property.

The house, chapel, and tavern have been included in Ripley’s Believe It or Not and 1000 Places to See Before You Die.

The house, chapel, and tavern have been included in <i>Ripley’s Believe It or Not</i> and <i>1000 Places to See Before You Die</i>.

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