LIFE

Famous Photos From History Are Colorized…And It Changes EVERYTHING!

by Giovanna Boldrini
Giovanna was born in Rome, Italy and currently resides in South Salem, New York. In her free time, she likes to cook with her children and grandchildren.

How often do you picture history in your mind’s eye, and see it in black and white? Up until the early 1970s, color photography was extremely rare.

Thanks to modern technology and photo editors with a passion for the past, colorizing old black and whites has recently become popular. Here are some of our favorite pieces of colorized history.

Check out famous moments and celebrities as you’ve never seen them before. These photos will change the way you feel about history…and they just may make you yearn for a time machine!

Please SHARE with your friends so they can see the past in living color, too!

Audrey Hepburn was beautiful no matter what...

Audrey Hepburn was beautiful no matter what...

But in color, her beauty is tangible. She feels real.

But in color, her beauty is tangible. She feels real.

When Kissing the War Goodbye gets the color treatment, the classic photograph explodes into our hearts and minds as it never has before.

When Kissing the War Goodbye gets the color treatment, the classic photograph explodes into our hearts and minds as it never has before.

Frank Worth's legendary photograph of the gorgeous Elizabeth Taylor on the set of the film "Giant" is sexy either way...but it feels like you're hanging out with Liz when you view it in color.

Frank Worth's legendary photograph of the gorgeous Elizabeth Taylor on the set of the film "Giant" is sexy either way...but it feels like you're hanging out with Liz when you view it in color.

Brief moments in time are put into perspective when we see the normal black and white images in color. This photo perfectly depicts racial tensions in the early 1960s, but the colorized version humanizes everyone involved. Especially the woman up front.

Brief moments in time are put into perspective when we see the normal black and white images in color. This photo perfectly depicts racial tensions in the early 1960s, but the colorized version humanizes everyone involved. Especially the woman up front.

A shot of color adds life to Anne Frank, if only for a moment.

A shot of color adds life to Anne Frank, if only for a moment.

Doesn't Einstein feel so much more human in blue beach shorts? Hah!

Doesn't Einstein feel so much more human in blue beach shorts? Hah!
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Lincoln gets the color treatment after the jump!!